Three Hundred Years of Jamaican History at the Seville Museum.

Canons stand guard in front of Seville Museum

 

The Seville property is 300 years of rich Jamaican history. Located in St. Ann, the property was a former great house and slave plantation. Seville is unique because three ethnic groups have converged on the property over centuries. Archaeological excavations have revealed evidence that Tainos, Africans and Europeans settled on the property.

 

Today, the Seville is a museum replete with artifacts and documents from 650 AD to the 19th century that were excavated on the property. Visitors get to peek back in time and see what life was like for the different group of settlers on the property.

 

Replica of enslaved African living quarters

Replica of enslaved African living quarters. Photo by: DIana O’Gilvie

 

Replica of Taino living quarters

Replica of Taino living quarters. Photo by: DIana O’Gilvie

Highlights of the tour for me were the names that the Tainos gave locations that still stand today, like Liguanea and Warieka Hills. In the African section of the exhibit, the names of slaves that were transported decorate the walls. The sheer number of names is a chilling reminder of the millions of lives affected by the slave trade. At the rear of the property are replicas of a Taino village and a slave quarters.

 

 

Seville Museum

Open daily from 9am -4pm

Telephone: (876) 972-2191

 

Slave logs.

Slave logs. Photo by: DIana O’Gilvie

 

A newspaper ad offering reward for a runaway slave

A newspaper ad offering reward for a runaway slave. Photo by: DIana O’Gilvie

 

Ruins of the overseers house on the property.

Ruins of the overseers house on the property. Photo by: DIana O’Gilvie

 

Newspaper article announcing the traditional burial of four enslaved Africans

Newspaper article announcing the traditional burial of four enslaved Africans. Photo by: DIana O’Gilvie

 

 

 

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